We’ve selected these apps based on their quality, user reviews, and overall reliability as a source of support for people living with rheumatoid arthritis. If you want to nominate an app for this list, email us at [email protected].

Managing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can be exhausting in itself. You’re likely juggling medications, doctor appointments, and various lifestyle changes. Since the condition affects people differently and can change from month to month, it’s important to keep track of your symptoms and how you respond to treatments. Having good records can be helpful for your healthcare team.

These apps are designed to help you stay organized, track your symptoms, learn about the latest research, and ultimately live a healthier, happier life.

rating: 3.9 stars

Price: Free

HealthLog lets you record almost every aspect of your day, including exercise, sleep, blood pressure, water intake, and more. The app then tracks the data and creates visual graphs of the results by month. It allows you to get very specific by recording both morning and evening weight, as well as what type of exercise you did during the day.

rating: 4.5 stars

Price: Free

When you only have so much time at a doctor visit, you want to make the most of it. MyRA is made specifically for keeping track of RA symptoms, so you can answer the question “How are you doing?” with accurate detail. Log joint pain, medications, stiffness, fatigue, and daily functioning in the app. Once the data is logged, you can use MyRA to create a visual report for your doctor from visit to visit.

rating: 4 stars

rating: 4.1 stars

Price: $4.99

Chronic pain of any type can be hard to describe to your healthcare team. You may forget important details between appointments or have trouble explaining how certain symptoms affected your daily activities. My Pain Diary allows you to track everything, from conditions and triggers, to how changes in weather affect you. The app puts your information into graphs, some of which are interactive, and helps you identify trends. You can also add photo attachments and create a customized report for your doctor.

rating: 5 stars

Price: Free

RAVE stands for Rheumatology Advance Vital Education. The app is made to be a resource for doctors caring for people with RA and other related conditions. It was developed by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and includes information on how to monitor disease activity with diagnostic criteria, disease activity scales, and medication guides. Doctors can safely store individual patient information in a password-protected patient chart.

rating: Not enough ratings

rating: 4.5 stars

Price: Free

Even doctors sometimes need to do research. RheumaHelper is a mobile tool for doctors treating RA and other related conditions. It provides references for how to track and classify the diseases based on published clinical research. The app’s content is checked for accuracy by doctors experienced in the field who also work at the University Clinical Centre in Ljubljana, Slovenia.

rating: Not enough ratings

Price: Free

Although this app is designed to help doctors make informed decisions in the treatment of patients with RA, it can also be helpful to those living with RA. @Point of Care for RA has a variety of evidence-based treatment content, case studies, and interviews with patients. It also includes a list of references to help you find more information. If you’re someone who likes to know what doctors are reading about your condition, you’ll find this app has lots to offer.

rating: 4 stars

Price: Free

RA Helper is your personal assistant for keeping track of treatments and your RA’s activity. You can store medication information and lab results, as well as set reminders for doctor appointments and when to take meds. The app keeps track of everything and turns recorded disease scores into activity graphs that help you and your doctor decide on future treatment plans.

rating: 4.2 stars

Price: Free

When you live with a chronic condition like RA, it can feel lonely. My RA Team links you to a password-protected social network of other people living with RA. You can post updates about your treatment, add details about your diagnosis, tell others how you’re feeling, and offer support to those who need it. There’s also a Q&A section to ask and answer questions.

rating: 4.9 stars

Price: Free

RAPA offers an easy way to keep track of your RA symptoms. The app allows you to log answers to a series of questions, like how bad joint pain and swelling were for the day, or if you had to miss work due to RA. The app then organizes the data using charts and color-coded diagrams. You can then print the information or show it to your doctor.

rating: 4.1 stars

Price: Free

The progression of RA can be monitored by a disease activity score (DAS). The score is calculated using a formula based on how many tender or swollen joints you have — by examining 28 joints total. DAS28 lets you use the app to calculate your own DAS during treatment.

rating: Not yet rated

rating: 4.6 stars

Price: Free

If you’ve ever had trouble communicating with your doctor, this app could help. The first step is to log your RA symptoms into cliexa-RA. The app then translates the information into a model doctors use to evaluate RA patients and recommend treatments. The app also calculates your disease activity score.